Cincinnati raises the Transgender Pride Flag as part of International Transgender Day of Visibility

On a blustery Thursday in Cincinnati, a new flag flies high at City Hall to show transgender people that amid the controversial rhetoric unfolding across the country, this city has your back. For Councilman Mark Jeffreys , hoisting the transgender pride flag is a symbol of support for the LGBTQ+ community. “I think this is an important statement from our city,” Jeffreys said. But as a father, today is personal for Mark Jeffreys. “You have different expectations of what society, in quotes, expects of your child and what your life would be like with your child,” Jeffreys said. He first announced that his child had come out as trans the year last parents calling them child molesters and all the violence i think its important to make a statement but also for people to understand that there are parents and the journey they go through said Jeffreys. In Kentucky, a bill was passed t In Ohio, Bill 454 would criminalize gender-affirming medical care. Councilman Reggie Harris announced the city would propose legislation to protect LGBTQ+ people from some of these bills.”We needed to go further and double down on our alliance and our affirmation of transgender people in our community,” Harris said. Transgender advocates say hateful rhetoric can c lead to violence or worse against the trans community. you stand there and just assume you don’t have a questioning or non-binary or transgender child, all you do is say your love for them is a condition and their home is not a safe space,” said Elliot Kesse, a transgender advocate. At the Cincinnati Main Library from 4-7 p.m. there is an event to celebrate today’s Transgender Visibility Day with different advocacy organizations.

On a blustery Thursday in Cincinnati, a new flag flies high at City Hall to show transgender people that amid the controversial rhetoric unfolding across the country, this city has your back.

For Councilman Mark Jeffreys, raising the transgender pride flag is a symbol of support for the LGBTQ+ community.

“I think this is an important statement from our city,” Jeffreys said.

But as a father, this day is personal for Mark Jeffreys.

“You have different expectations of what society expects of your child and what your life would be like with your child,” Jeffreys said.

He first announced that his child had come out as trans last year.

On this day of transgender visibility, he felt it was important to share.

“You have states that criminalize parents, call them child molesters and all the violence, I think it’s important to make a statement, but also for people to understand that there are parents and the journey they’re going through,” Jeffreys said.

In Kentucky, a bill has been passed that prohibits trans girls from playing on women’s sports teams because it “creates unequal playing conditions”.

In Ohio, House Bill 454 would criminalize gender-affirming medical care.

Councilman Reggie Harris announced that the city would be proposing legislation to protect LGBTQ+ people from some of these bills.

“We needed to take it a step further and double down on our alliance and our affirmation of transgender people in our community,” Harris said.

Transgender advocates say hateful rhetoric can lead to violence or worse against the trans community.

“When you stand there and just assume you don’t have a questioning child or a non-binary or a transgender child, all you’re doing is saying your love for them is a condition and that their home is not a safe space,” said Elliot Kesse, a transgender rights advocate.

At the Cincinnati Main Library from 4-7 p.m. there is an event to celebrate today’s Transgender Awareness Day with different advocacy organizations.

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